Three 20-something women trying to figure out what it means to be lay, Catholic, and modern all at once.

January 26, 2010

The Truth of the March

Agatha forwarded me a blog post from Newsweek on the March for Life entitled, "Who’s Missing at the 'Roe v. Wade' Anniversary Demonstrations? Young Women." The author fabricates the entire report of the March for Life:

Today is the 37th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the landmark Supreme Court case legalizing abortion, and droves of women are prepared to face rainy weather to support their positions during the annual Washington, D.C., demonstrations. But there will be one major difference with the demonstration route this year—it’s shorter.

“The organizers are getting older, and it’s more difficult for them to walk a long distance,” says Stanley Radzilowski, an officer in the planning unit for the Washington, D.C., police department. A majority of the participants are in their 60s and were the original pioneers either for or against the case, he says.

So this raises the question: where are the young, vibrant women supporting their pro-life or pro-choice positions? Likely, they’re at home. “Young women are still concerned about these issues, but they’re not trained to go out and protest,” says Kristy Maddux, assistant professor at the University of Maryland, who specializes in historical feminism.

If you note the comments on the bottom, the notion that the March was shorter is patently false. And from someone who walks it nearly every year, it was the same as usual. Even Robert McCartney, a pro-choice op-ed columnist from The Washington Post reveals a different sentiment:

I went to the March for Life rally Friday on the Mall expecting to write about its irrelevance. Isn't it quaint, I thought, that these abortion protesters show up each year on the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, even though the decision still stands after 37 years. What's more, with a Democrat in the White House likely to appoint justices who support abortion rights, surely the Supreme Court isn't going to overturn Roe in the foreseeable future. How wrong I was. The antiabortion movement feels it's gaining strength, even if it's not yet ready to predict ultimate triumph, and Roe supporters (including me) are justifiably nervous. "We are the pro-life generation," said signs carried by the crowd, about half its members appearing to be younger than 30. There were numerous large groups of teenagers, many bused in by Roman Catholic schools and youth groups. They and their adult leaders said the youths were taught from an early age to oppose abortion. "People our age are going to be the ones to change, to be the future leaders," said Lauren Powers, 16, who came with a group from an all-girls Catholic school in Milwaukee."
All I can say is that a significant number of the 400,000 people who marched on Friday in support of women, children, and men who have suffered from the legalization of abortion were young, vibrant, well-educated, and spirited. No matter how people spin it, the truth will set us free.

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